Alan P. Linton, Jr. Emergency Shelter

The Alan P. Linton, Jr. Emergency Shelter is an 88-bed facility that offers homeless adults a safe place to sleep, shower, and receive laundry assistance.

In 2020, during the pandemic, the Coalition sheltered 273 individuals with 27,101 bed nights.

One third of Alan P. Linton, Jr. Emergency Shelter residents are age 52 and older.

%

In 2018, the Urban Institute estimated that 25% of the homeless population is employed.

If you or someone you know needs emergency shelter call

301-631-2670 x 112

 

Alan P. Linton, Jr. Emergency Shelter

Hours of Operation:
Year-Round, 7 days/ a week

Clients Admitted:
Nightly, 6:30-9:00pm
No admittance after 9:00pm
Closes: 7:00am

Emergency Shelter Contact Information:
Kavonte Duckett, Director of Alan P. Linton, Jr.  Emergency Shelter
kduckett@rcehn.org
301-631-2670 x 114

Brenda Bell, Case Manager, Alan P. Linton, Jr.  Emergency Shelter
bbell@rcehn.org
301-631-2670 x 113

Tanyqua Williams, Case Manager, Alan P. Linton, Jr.  Emergency Shelter
mwilliams@rcehn.org
301-631-2670 x 124

A completed Intake application is required for first time clients.  ID is required to stay at the shelter. 

%

According to National Alliance to End Homelessness 30% of the homeless population in 2019 were people in families.

Alan P. Linton, Jr.’s Legacy

The Coalition’s Emergency Shelter opened in 2002 and was named in memory of Alan P. Linton, Jr. 

Alan had many passions and interests. He loved his family, football, and was a foodie. Alan loved to learn. A true Marylander, Alan was a huge fan of the Orioles and Cal Ripken, Jr. He was a wrestler in school and earned the nickname “The Iron Man”.  

Despite growing up in a small town, Alan had big dreams of becoming a success on Wall Street. A wiz at numbers, Alan worked as a 26-year-old financial analyst at an investment firm on the 104th floor of the World Trade Center’s South Tower.

Alan’s family was incredibly important to him. Despite working more than 200 miles away in New York City, Alan made the trip home to Maryland every weekend. Alan was active in his family’s church, the Frederick Church of the Brethren. Sharing his family’s passion for serving in the community, Alan saw himself becoming a philanthropist, giving back to those in need.   

Only 26, Alan lost his life in the September 11, 2001 attacks on the Twin Towers. Sharon and Pat Linton chose to honor their son’s remarkable life with a generous gift to help establish the new emergency shelter. As a result, Alan’s desire to serve his community lives on. The shelter bearing his name has provided thousands of people with shelter since it was established.

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